Water Wisdom – from the I Ching

When flowing water … meets with obstacles on its path, a blockage in its journey, it pauses. It increases in volume and strength, filling up in front of the obstacle and eventually spilling past it….

When you meet with an obstacle, do not turn and run, for there is nowhere worthwhile for you to go. Do not attempt to push ahead into the danger … emulate the example of the water: Pause and build up your strength until the obstacle no longer represents a blockage.

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Water Wisdom – from the I Ching

  1. LAIRD

    Sound advice, the next obstacle around the bend is always larger than the one recently surmounted. Each one pales into insignificance as our lives flow to its conclusion.

    Reply
  2. Kenneth

    How we face obstacles can leave us either empowered or hopeless. They can stop us or motivate us. They can discourage us from doing the things we would love to do, or like a dare, a block can bring up our competitive drive to push through and triumph.
     
    May your water of truth never dry up Kate.

    Reply
  3. Mei's

     
    Hello Kate, reading this post has make me think deep on what you had written in here, it’s like a reflection in the lake, showing me the picture! Thanks Kate, I know what to do now. Love reading you blog, they have alot good advices. Mei

    Reply
  4. Scary Faerie

    HI KATE
     
    MANY THANKS FOR ACCEPTING THE INVITE. WISE WORDS. A BEAUTIFUL SPACE FILLED WITH SOUND ADVICE AND LOTS OF COMMON SENSE. I SHALL ENJOY MY FURTHER VISITS!

    Reply
  5. Mei's

     
    Morning Kate, just a short question, what is I Ching mean? Sounds Chinese? look forward to hear from you. Mei

    Reply
  6. Suki x

    Oh  No ! i cannot compete with all this philosophy! make mine sparkling mineral water please, and I will drink to a clear passage through the river of life!
     
    Love Suki x

    Reply
  7. Coffee With Kate

    In answer to "I Love my BiPolar’s" question……….The I Ching, often spelled as I Jing, Yi Ching, Yi King, or Yi Jing; also called "Book of Changes" or "Classic of Changes", is the oldest of the Chinese classic texts.  A symbol system designed to identify order in what seem like chance events, it describes an ancient system of cosmology and philosophy. The philosophy centers on the ideas of the dynamic balance of opposites, the evolution of events as a process, and acceptance of the inevitability of change. In Western cultures, the I Ching is regarded by some as simply a system of divination; many believe it expresses the wisdom and philosophy of ancient China.

    Reply
  8. Mei's

     
    THanyou Kate, I thank I got the meaning now, but I just still wonder what I Ching mean in Chinese that all, maybe find some friends to tell me. I did look in the Internet, but I never heard I Ching before, still not sure what it is in Chinese! Thanks anyway Kate. Good day. Mei

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s