Thyme & Turmeric-healing herbs & spices for your kitchen

Today I will discuss the last two items on the list of healing herbs and spices; Thyme and Turmeric. Passed down to us by our forefathers and countless generations throughout the world, the 15 food additives and enhancers as discussed, are just a selected few herbs and spices that are currently known to have medicinal and beneficial properties, yet represent the more commonly used. By including these herbs and spices into your daily cooking or diet on a regular basis, you will greatly enhance your quality of life, and reduce the need for those expensive, and often damaging pharmaceutical drugs.

Thyme has what I would describe as a ‘vigorous’ flavour, almost peppery in character, and is for foods that can carry strong flavours. It is also one of the essential herbs in the mixture herbes de Provence, along with savoury, bay leaves, and rosemary. It is always included in a bouquet garni. Thyme is usually cooked with the food rather than being added at the end, although the new shoots of lemon thyme can be added to salads. Thyme finds itself being tested for everything from its antibiotic principals to its volatile oil. Some researchers say it can kill bacteria in 40 seconds.

14. THYME – Thyme contains thymol, which increases blood-flow to the skin. The warmth is comforting, and some herbalists believe that the increased blood-flow speeds healing. An anti-spasmodic. Thyme relaxes respiratory muscles and is endorsed for treating bronchitis by Commission E, the expert panel that judges the safety and effectiveness of herbal medicines for the German government. Aroma therapists say that thyme’s scent is a mood lifter.  It is antiseptic and antibacterial, soothing sore throats, coughs, colds, allergic rhinitis, hay fever, back pain, aches and pains, poor digestion, scabies and lice, ringworm and thrush, athletes foot, chest ailments, in particular asthma and bronchitis, hangovers, insomnia and poor circulation. Thyme also stimulates the body’s production of white blood corpuscles to resist infection. Thyme has antiseptic, expectorant and antispasmodic properties. It soothes fungal and inflammatory conditions and is now claimed as one of the anti-ageing herbs.

Thyme goes with:  Bay leaves, chicken, fish, garlic, lamb, lemons, mustard, olive oil, onions, orange zest, parsley, rabbit, rosemary, tomatoes, venison,…..

We now move onto turmeric, the last in the list of 15 healing herbs and spices. Much loved and favoured in Indian and Asian cooking and is essential in the making of curry powder. Turmeric is a rhizome related to the ginger family, it is bright orange when fresh and becomes a vibrant yellow with drying. dried and ground turmeric is a common ingredient in Asian cooking, providing a brilliant yellow colour and musky flavour. 15. TURMERIC – iIt is only during the last two decades that turmeric’s therapeutic actions have been researched and understood. There has been an upurge of interest in foods that have health benefits like lowering high cholesterol, cancer prevention or that have anti-inflammatory actions, and turmeric does all of that. Many clinical studies agree that curcumin in turmeric has anti-inflammatory effects, including a significant beneficial effect in relieving rheumatoid arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome. Curcumin, which gives this spice its familiar yellow pigment, may also lower cholesterol. Turmeric is also packed with antioxidants, including vitamins A, C, and E, which have been shown to prevent cataracts.

Turmeric goes with: curries, curried eggs, lentils, beans, rice dishes, vegetable dishes like brinjals (eggplant), & green peppers, meat dishes, savoury dishes.

And so ends this little project, the content which I hope you have all enjoyed reading. This will also be my last posting for a little while. Thanks to everyone who added their own snippets of information to this topic.

Until next time…. xxx

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17 thoughts on “Thyme & Turmeric-healing herbs & spices for your kitchen

  1. swamp

    Morning Kate. Really enjoyed this. Hope you don’t stay away too long; I’ll still drop in for a coffee.
    Have a good Friday; and a point for yesterdays little question. Tough one for the weekend. 🙂

    Reply
  2. Kenneth

    Morning Kate.
                             Thankyou for bringing this most informative piece of research to my attention, it has been a delight to follow and have enjoyed experimenting with some of your suggestions, in fact I did try Rosemary with a choice piece of Cod and I must say it was delicious.
     
    Going fishing at the weekend, just love my trout suppers.
    looking forward to your next project if I am still welcome to comment. ?
    Have a wonderful weekend      Kenny.

    Reply
  3. swamp

    Morning Kate. Just splashing by for a coffee to start the weekend.
    Hope things are ok for you.
    Have an enjoyable weekend 🙂

    Reply
  4. Suki x

    hi Kate, thank you for this insite into the properties of herbs, it has been so interesting, I shall keep coming back for reminders.   Had roast lamb today and made a stuffing containing Thyme and Rosemary, but a little short of Rosemary so added Lavender to make up the quantity, the whole thing was delicious
     
    Love Suki x

    Reply
  5. swamp

    Afternoon Kate, just splashed over for a coffee, and to put my feet up for a while, whilst I take in the view.
    Enjoy the rest of Monday   🙂

    Reply
  6. Dusty

    Not visited for a while so have now caught up on your excellent herb series – thank you for that…..most informative.
    Look forward to your return.
    Love
    Dusty
    x
     

    Reply
  7. Kenneth

    Hi Kate.
                  Have a splended weekend, where ever you are…lovely sunshine here today and the forcast is good also,  may get my first layer of suntan for the year.
                                                                                            Happy easter      Kenny.
                                                                                             

    Reply
  8. Judex

    Hi Kate,
     
    Hope you spent a peaceful Easter.
     
    As always, your page is a treasure. Keep teaching us.
     
    Love and kisses to you.
    Judex.

    Reply
  9. Peter

    Hi KateI hope you had a Happy Easter Kate, and things are going well for you.I had a wee surprise myself, (don’t laugh) … the prospect of a book deal ! but I would have to mention a lot more stuff than I’ve already published, so careful thought will go into this one.See you around, and when you come to Scotland to see that spectacular scenery, we will have to link up !Peter

    Reply
  10. Peter

    Hi KateYes, well theres a lot more than whats in the blog to go into a book, and it is tempting. At the moment Im waiting back to hear what might/might not be acceptable tor publication … theres just so much scandal to quote I think their lawyers are a little bit overwhelmed on it – and I can see my nemesis DM trying to put the boot in over it …Thinking of today’s date though .. i hope it doesnt end up like "Friday the 13th" with the Law Society boss dressed as Freddie with the fingergloves …. errm !Have a good one, Peter

    Reply
  11. Judex

    Hi Kate,
     
    Wonderful series of articles about the herbs. It will be a very good reference for me as I always asked the Cooks at the restaurants to add a little of this and that because I appreciate the taste and the appetising smell.  I think that I always need a little more of the herbs because I eat too much chilli. In a way, too much chilli kills the other tastes ! 
     
    I will particularly appreciate a series about the South African wines.  You know I am a good Drinker of wines, but not really knowing the stories behind them.  I am sure many of your Readers will appreciate.
     
    Thanks for your virtual coffee.
     
    Take care,
    Judex.
     
     

    Reply
  12. Isabelle

     Nice co-incidence.
     
    My little boy is kind of allergic and use to cough with runny noise and lots of mucus. So far he eats and plays like any other child.
     
    I was not willing to give him further medicine because the mucus and coughing always came back.
     
    Then I remembered that my grandma use to boil thyme in let it infuse. She added a little sugar and honey and I drank it hot.
     
    I did the same for my son and I was amazed to find that the mucus and cough occured less and less frquently.
     
    Even at night he sleeps peacefully now.
     
    Nature has indeed given to a our medicines and it’s up to us to learn how to use it.
    Thanks for gathering all these info. I’ve learned a lot! 

    Reply
  13. Isabelle

     Nice co-incidence.
     
    My little boy is kind of allergic and use to cough with runny noise and lots of mucus. So far he eats and plays like any other child.
     
    I was not willing to give him further medicine because the mucus and coughing always came back.
     
    Then I remembered that my grandma use to boil thyme in let it infuse. She added a little sugar and honey and I drank it hot.
     
    I did the same for my son and I was amazed to find that the mucus and cough occured less and less frquently.
     
    Even at night he sleeps peacefully now.
     
    Nature has indeed given to a our medicines and it’s up to us to learn how to use it.
    Thanks for gathering all these info. I’ve learned a lot! 

    Reply

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